Is your domestic violence charge rooted in fact?

On behalf of Brian D. Roman, Attorney at Law on Thursday, September 3, 2015.

Domestic violence is something that law enforcement and prosecutors take very seriously. Many states even have laws that if a domestic violence accusation is made, one of the people involved must either leave or be arrested. This is even if the alleged victim does not want charges filed.

There are many statistics that cover this type of crime. One of them is that about 1.3 million women and 835,000 men are physically assaulted by their partner annually in America. That isn't to point the finger at any one person because many times, when the report is made, the argument wasn't violent and the call shouldn't have been made. In other words, mistakes happen and you shouldn't have to pay for being verbal about your opinions.

In the years of 1995-1996, there was a study that said that almost 25 percent of women and 6 percent of men were raped and could have been physically assaulted by either their former or their current spouse. Being accused of this crime can have devastating effects on your life. You can become alienated from your children, and you could even lose your job.

In 2001, another study stated that a full 20 percent of all nonfatal violent crime was against women. While this may be true, you may not agree that what you do in the privacy of your home is illegal. It only takes one phone call from your spouse and you could be behind bars and charged.

Having the right attorney at a time like this can help you feel like you are not alone. You may have lost your temper, but no violence actually occurred. How can you get someone to believe you? A knowledgeable attorney who knows the system can be of great assistance.

Source: American Bar Association, "Domestic Violence Statistics," accessed Sep. 03, 2015